Tag Archives: play

Play audio in an iOS app with Xamarin

This tutorial explains how to play audio files in the background in an iOS app. An audio file can play when a screen loads or when an event occurs (such as a button press or change in a variable’s value). The example app in this tutorial will play a sound when a button is pressed. We will also look at how to use the Vibrate function in an iPhone to make the phone vibrate as well as playing a sound.

Here is what this app will look like:

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Step 1 

Open Xamarin and click File > New Solution. Then select iOS App and SingleView App as the project template. Click Next.

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Step 2

Give your new app a name and select a target iOS version. Click Next. On the following screen, confirm the project and solution name and then click Create.

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Step 3

When the solution opens, right-click on the project folder. Select Add > New Folder.

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Give the new folder the name Sounds.

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Step 4

Right-click on the new Sounds folder and select Add > Add files from folder.

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Step 5

Navigate to the folder which contains the audio file(s) you wish to use in your app. Click Open.

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Step 6 

Select the audio files you wish to include in the project (for this example, we will use an MP3 file called mysound.mp3). Click OK.

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Then select Copy the file to the directory and click OK. This file will be copied to the project’s Sounds folder. You should then be able to see the audio file in the Sounds folder within the project folder from the Solution panel.

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Step 7

Right-click on the audio file in the Sounds folder. Select Build Action and set to BundleResource (if this does not work during testing, try selecting Content instead).

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Step 8

Open the Main.storyboard file. Change the View to your desired iPhone/iPad model. Drag three Button elements on to the screen as shown below. Give the first button a Name of playSoundButton and the text value ‘Play sound’. Give the second button a Name of playSoundVibrateButton and the text value ‘Play sound and vibrate’. Give the third button a Name of vibrateButton and the text value ‘Vibrate’. Save the file.

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Click the image to see a larger version.

Step 9

Open the ViewController.cs file and add the following two highlighted lines of code. The first two highlighted lines allow us to access audio tools and lower-level classes. url defines where the location and name of the audio file, while mySound is the name of the variable holding the sound file.

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Click the image to see a larger version.

Step 10

Now add the following two highlighted lines of code in the ViewDidLoad method. Here we define the location and filename of the audio file as well as directing the mySound variable to use this audio file. Replace mysound.mp3 with the name of your sound file.

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Click the image to see a larger version.

Step 11 

Now create a TouchUpInside event for each of the three buttons in the ViewDidLoad method. Inside the new methods for each TouchUpInside event, add the lines of code shown below.

  • SystemSound.PlaySystemSound(); will just play the sound
  • SystemSound.PlayAlertSound(); will play the sound and vibrate the phone
  • SystemSound.Vibrate.PlaySystemSound(); will just vibrate the phone
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Click the image to see a larger version.

That’s it! Now go and test the app!

Play audio in an Android app with Xamarin

This tutorial explains how to play audio in an Android app made in Xamarin. The audio can be played when a screen loads or when an event occurs such as a button click or change in a variable’s value. For this tutorial, we will play a sound when a button is tapped.

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Step 1

Start by creating a new app solution in Xamarin (click File > New Solution). Select Android App as the project template. Click Next.

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Give the new app a name. Then click Next.

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Confirm the solution and project name, Make sure you specify a folder to store your project files in and then click Create.

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Step 2

Open the Main.axml file (in Resources > layout). Delete the button already there. Save the file.

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Step 3 

Open the MainActivity.cs file and delete the highlighted lines of code (these lines for the button are not needed anymore as we won’t be using the default button).

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Step 4 

Right-click on the Resources folder. Select Add > New Folder.

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Give the new folder the name ‘raw’ and then press Enter.

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Step 5

Select the new ‘raw’ folder and right-click it. Then click Add > Add files from folder.

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Step 6

Navigate to the folder which contains the audio file(s) you wish to use in your app. Click Open.

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Step 7

Select the audio files you wish to include in the project (for this example, we will use an MP3 file called mysound.mp3). Click OK.

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Then select Copy the file to the directory and click OK. This file will be copied to the project’s raw folder. You should then be able to see the audio file in the raw folder from the Solution panel.

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Step 8

Open the Main.axml file again and drag a Button element from the Toolbox onto the phone screen. Change the button’s Id value to @+id/playButton. Then change its Text value to Play Sound. Save this file.

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Step 9

Open the MainActivity.cs file again. Add the following highlighted line of code to the top section of the existing code. This will give us access to Android.Media.

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Click the image to see a larger version.

Step 10

Add the following two highlighted lines of code to the MainActivity.cs file to define the MediaPlayer element and to include the audio file in the code. Replace mysound with the name of your audio file (there is no need to include the .mp3 extension).

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Click the image to see a larger version.

Step 11

Now add the following two highlighted lines of code to define the Button element and access the playButton button from the screen.

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Click the image to see a larger version.

Step 12

Now add a click event for the button inside the OnCreate method. As you type playButton.Click+= and press the spacebar key you will see a list of options. You should see the option to create the PlayButton_Click method (if you don’t, start typing its name until it shows up – as shown below). Double-click this option from the list to create a new method.

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Click the image to see a larger version.

Step 13

Inside the new PlayButton_Click method add the line _player.Start(); – this will play the sound file when the button is clicked/tapped by the user. You can use this line anywhere in your app to play the sound (not just on a click event).

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Click the image to see a larger version.

That’s it! Now go and test your app. Hint: You can also add a button that runs the line of code _player.Stop(); to stop the audio file playing.

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Adding sound to a game in PlayCanvas

This tutorial explains how to add sound effects and background music to your game in PlayCanvas. You can add sounds that can be heard from anywhere in the game or attach sounds to objects that can only be heard when your character is near them in the game.

You can also add sounds that automatically play and loop in the background and you can also control when sounds play and stop using code. Using code to control sound will be explained in the next tutorial. Watch the video below to see how to add sound to your game.

South Of The Border by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Artist: http://audionautix.com/

Rigid Bodies and Collision in PlayCanvas

This tutorial explains how to add the Rigid Body and Collision components to objects in your game so that your objects can move around and interact in a realistic way and so that you can detect when different objects collide in your game.

Rigid bodies allow the objects in your game to act under the control of physics. This means that your objects will be able to receive forces and move around in a realistic way. In order for an object to be able to interact with other objects and be under the influence of gravity or different forces (that can be controlled by scripts), it must have a Rigid Body component. You can change the properties of a rigid body such as friction, restitution (bounciness), mass, and so on.

The Collision component in PlayCanvas will give an object its physical form and change the way it behaves. There are several types of colliders (collision types) such as box, sphere, capsule, etc. If you give a box object a box collider, it will behave like a box. This means it will move around, slide, bounce, fall, and collide with other objects the way that a box would. If you give a sphere or ball object a sphere collider, then it will be able to bounce and roll around just like a real sphere or ball would. The Collision component is necessary for collision detection and triggers (something we will look at in another tutorial).

Watch the video below and then scroll down to see the sample code used for basic collision detection in the video.

Sample code for the collider.js script:

pc.script.create('collider', function (app) {
    // Creates a new Collider instance
    var Collider = function (entity) {
        this.entity = entity;
    };

    Collider.prototype = {
        // Called once after all resources are loaded and before the first update
        initialize: function () {
            this.entity.collision.on('collisionstart', this.onCollisionStart, this);
        },

        onCollisionStart: function(result){
            if(result.other.rigidbody){
                this.entity.destroy();
            }
        }
        
        
    };

    return Collider;
});